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Video: New 2017 Duramax Spotted. Hear It Run
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 Watch a Stunt Driver Set a 115-mph World Record for Driving on Two Wheels [VIDEO]


Side-wheelie

You may have seen stunt drivers drive on two wheels before, but you definitely haven't seen it done at this speed. That's because the run you can watch below just set the Guinness World Record for "fastest side wheelie" in a car, at 115.742 mph.
The record was set by Finnish stunt driver Vesa Kivimäki behind the wheel of a diesel-powered BMW 3-series. Nokian Tires sponsored the run, using it as an opportunity to show off its fancy new Aramid sidewalls, which clearly can take some abuse.
We can't find any evidence online of a previous record, but that doesn't make Kivimäki's run any less impressive. There is, however, a record for the longest such stunt in a car, which covered an astounding distance of 230.57 miles.
Congrats, Vesa Kivimäki, on driving into the record book-sideways, and at a ridiculous speed.


Better mileage than a Prius!

 



Don't miss this:  A Winnipeg car enthusiast,  Boyd Van Aggelen is spear heading a once in a lifetime ride down the 'HISTORIC ROUTE 66" See the poster below and e-mail Boyd for any further details.

Watch for more information posted on the upcoming November meeting which will be held here at AUTO SHOW on McGillivray Blvd.

         

Travel the iconic Route 66, 2183 miles, from Adams Street in Chicago to the Santa Monica pier in Los Angeles.

An adventure is being planned for any enthusiastic car buffs that are interested in driving this famous "Highway of America". The trip will begin in September 2017 and take approximately 10 days.

If interested please contact Boyd Van Aggelen - Email: bvanagge@shaw.ca 

An organizational meeting will take place Tuesday, November 1, 2016, at which time more information will be provided.







                              

Mercedes-Benz reveals luxury pickup truck

Mercedes-Benz is jumping into the luxury pickup game, where profits are plentiful.
The luxury automotive brand, a division of German automaker Daimler, revealed a premium pickup truck dubbed the X-Class.
The company on Tuesday showed off a concept version of the mid-size pickup truck at an event in Stockholm, saying the five-seat ride will hit showrooms in late 2017.
But there's a catch. It's not initially targeted at the U.S. market, where customers are fiercely loyal to pickups offered by General Motors, Ford, Fiat Chrysler, Toyota, Nissan and Honda.
Daimler identified "key markets" for the X-Class as Argentina, Brazil, South Africa, Australia, New Zealand and Europe.

The stylish explorer design variant of the Mercedes-Benz

It was not immediately clear whether any units would be available for sale in the U.S. A spokesperson could not be reached for comment Tuesday afternoon.
With oil trading in the $50-per-barrel range and gasoline prices low, bigger vehicles such as pickups have flourished. They bring hefty profits, too.
Japanese automaker Nissan agreed to manufacture the X-Class at its plant in Barcelona, Spain, for sale in the European, Australian and South African markets.
French automaker Renault will produce the X-Class at its factory in Cordoba, Argentina, for sale in Latin America. Renault and Nissan have an existing global alliance and ownership structure.
"We will open up and change the segment of mid-size pickups - with the world's first true premium pickup for the modern urban lifestyle,' Mercedez-Benz vans chief Volker Mornhinweg said in a statement. "Our future X-Class will be a pickup that knows no compromise."
The X-Class's top model will boast a six-cylinder diesel engine with all-wheel drive, payload of more than 1.1 tons and towing capacity of up to 3.5 tons.
Mercedes-Benz said interior options available on its luxury cars, such as the C-Class and V-Class, will be available on the X-Class, as well. It will also develop a "special range of accessories," such as bed cove




Self-driving truck makes first trip - a 120-mile beer run


SAN FRANCISCO - If you're sipping a Budweiser somewhere in Colorado Springs, you just might have a robot to thank for that thirst-quenching brew.
Last week, self-driving truck start-up Otto teamed with Anheuser-Busch to successfully deliver a semi-tractor full of beer from Fort Collins, through Denver and on to the southern Colorado city in the shadow of Pikes Peak.
For the majority of that 120-mile trip, the truck's driver left his seat and observed the road from the comfort of the sleeper berth. An Otto video of the drive shows the slightly disconcerting image of a massive 53-foot trailer filled with 2,000 cases of Bud rumbling down I-25 with no human in the cab.
Otto's tech is at present confined to highways, and humans take over in city traffic. Otto and Anheuser-Busch, which announced the news Tuesday, plan additional real-world autonomous truck drives in the months ahead.
"The initial appeal for us was to see how we could meet the needs of a company like Anheuser-Busch," Otto co-founder Lior Ron tells USA TODAY. "But now after this successful test, we're eager to see how it will handle other roads and other weather."

Trucking industry advocates remain concerned about both the technology's ability to decipher every road emergency and the danger of having a driver resting or even sleeping while a truck is at highway speeds.
For Anheuser-Busch Inbev, a global spirits juggernaut valued at $213 billion, the appeal of the partnership was to "see if we could help pioneer technology that will make the jobs of those shipping product easier and safer," says James Sembrot, senior director of logistics and safety for Anheuser-Busch.
Sembrot says the company's beer travels an estimated 450 million miles a year to its various destinations. Anheuser-Busch doesn't own any trucks, but rather contracts with 300 trucking companies nationwide.
"We liked the prospect of those folks traveling safer in trucks that help improve environmental impact (through increased gas mileage)," he says. "There's no question in our mind that transportation companies will want to make these improvements."
The Otto landmark stands in stark contrast to the ongoing self-driving car tests by Google, Uber and Ford in California, Arizona and other states that require a safety driver to remain at the wheel in case of emergencies.
At present, states offer self-driving tech companies a patchwork of laws that, in time, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration is hoping to corral into a cohesive autonomous car policy.
In Colorado, the Department of Transportation worked with Otto for a number of months evaluating the company's technology and joining on test runs before agreeing to let an Otto semi roll along without a driver in the cab.
"Safety remained our primary concern, but we believe that in this case the driver is the automated system itself," says Amy Ford, spokeswoman for the Colorado DOT, whose RoadX mission is to partner with innovative companies to help insure that the state leads the way in the coming transportation revolution. "We'd like to help get this tech deployed in the real world."
Otto, which was founded early this year by Google Car veterans Ron and Anthony Levandowski, was bought by Uber last August for $670 million. Uber is boosting its self-driving tech initiative with Levandowski now in charge of leading the ride-hailing giant's charge.
The concept behind Otto is to produce an aftermarket kit comprised of radar and camera sensors that, when harnessed to proprietary software, will allow the nation's 350,000 owner-operator truckers to keep their trucks on the road longer without cutting into their carefully monitored driving time.
Otto's - and Uber's - interest in cornering the trucking market doesn't need much explanation. In 2015, trucking brought in $726 billion in revenue and accounted for 81% of all freight transport, according to the American Trucking Associations.

Trucking industry advocates remain concerned about both the technology's ability to decipher every road emergency and the danger of having a driver resting or even sleeping while a truck is at highway speeds.
For Anheuser-Busch Inbev, a global spirits juggernaut valued at $213 billion, the appeal of the partnership was to "see if we could help pioneer technology that will make the jobs of those shipping product easier and safer," says James Sembrot, senior director of logistics and safety for Anheuser-Busch.
Sembrot says the company's beer travels an estimated 450 million miles a year to its various destinations. Anheuser-Busch doesn't own any trucks, but rather contracts with 300 trucking companies nationwide.
"We liked the prospect of those folks traveling safer in trucks that help improve environmental impact (through increased gas mileage)," he says. "There's no question in our mind that transportation companies will want to make these improvements.